Our Sacred Garden

A Healthy Garden is a Healthy Life

1 oz. Coltsfoot Leaf (Tusilago Farfara) Organic & Kosher Bulgaria

$1.95
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Estimated to arrive by Wednesday, December 27th

Estimated delivery date is Wednesday, December 27th. This estimate is based on:

  • The seller's handling time
  • USPS First Class Mail (2 to 3 business days) transit time to US

Actual delivery times may vary. The item could arrive as early as Tuesday, December 26th.

$2.95 via USPS First Class Mail (2 to 3 business days) to United States
Quantity Available
15 in stock
Return policy
Full refund available within 30 days

Item details

UPC
Does not apply
Condition
New
Brand
Our Sacred Garden
Formulation
dry herb
Active Ingredients
Coltsfoot Leaf

About this item

 

Also known as

Tussilago farfara, Horsehoof, Coughwort, Fieldhove, Bullsfoot, Cleats, Clayweed, Tusilago, and Ass’s Foot.

Introduction

Coltsfoot grows wild over much of Europe, and has been used traditionally to treat chest ailments for hundreds of years. The name is derived from the horseshoe shaped leaves. It was so popular in Europe at one time that French pharmacists painted its flowers on their doorposts. It was brought to the American colonies from Europe. American colonists were known to wrap persons afflicted with whooping cough in blankets that had been soaked with a coltsfoot infusion. Before the plant flowers, it resembles butterbur enough that old herbals caution against confusing the two.

Constituents

Mucilage, including numerous sugars; inulin; flavonoids, rutin, isoquercetin, tannin; pyrrolizidine alkaloids

Parts Used

Leaves, and sometimes the buds and flowers

Typical Preparations

Infusion, tea, syrup, capsules and extracts.

Summary

The USDA classifies coltsfoot as an herb of “unknown safety”, and the presence of minute amounts of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which have been found to cause liver toxicity and cancer, has led to its banning in West Germany. The amount of these alkaloids is extremely small, though, and the beneficial effects are generally believed to outweigh the miniscule risk. 

Precautions

Coltsfoot should not be used by pregnant women, as it may be an abortifacient, and the alkaloids seem to have a particularly harmful effect on the liver of the developing infant. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids present in the plant are potentially toxic in large doses, but have not proven toxic in the doses usually used to treat coughs. Still, it is recommended that coltsfoot tea or syrup not be used for more than 4-6 weeks at a time.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.